Często zadawane pytania

5-1/1 COACHING AT GOLF CENTRE FREE OF CHARGE
Question:
An amateur golfer gives a series of basic lessons in playing golf at a golf centre. He is not an employee of the centre and he does not receive any payment or compensation. Is he in breach of Rule 5-1?
Answer:

No. He is not in breach of Rule 5-1 because he has not accepted any payment or compensation, either directly or indirectly, from anyone for giving golf instruction at the golf centre. (Revised)

5-1/2 GOLF MANAGER OR GOLF SHOP ASSISTANT GIVING INSTRUCTION
Question:
An employee of a golf club, such as a Club Manager or golf shop assistant, is occasionally asked to give golf instruction but is not specifically compensated for this service. Is this permissible under the Rules?
Answer:

No. An employee of a golf club cannot give instruction as a requirement of his employment. The absence of any direct payment for the golf instruction or the proportion of time actually spent on golf instruction is irrelevant. (Revised)

5-1/3 SHOP ASSISTANT’S DUTIES TO INCLUDE DEMONSTRATION OF GOLF SWING
Question:
A teaching Professional wishes to take on a shop assistant who, in addition to his duties, will travel with the Professional and who, under guidance, will demonstrate the correct mechanics of the golf swing. Is this permissible under the Rules?
Answer:
No. The assistant’s salaried duties are not those of a shop assistant, but those of a teaching assistant. It would constitute a breach of Rule 5-1. The absence of any direct payment for golf instruction or the proportion of the time actually spent on golf instruction is irrelevant.

5-1/4 DONATION TO CHARITY AT SUGGESTION OF INSTRUCTOR
Question:
May an amateur golfer who has given golf instruction on a voluntary basis suggest to his pupils that they make a donation to a recognised charity after each lesson or coaching session?
Answer:
Yes, provided the pupil is under no obligation to do so and the amateur golfer does not benefit, directly or indirectly, from the donation. (New)

5-1/5 ACCEPTANCE OF PLAYING OR PRACTICE PRIVILEGES IN EXCHANGE FOR GIVING GOLF INSTRUCTION
Question:
May an amateur golfer accept playing or practice privileges at a Golf Club or golf course in exchange for giving golf instruction?
Answer:
No. The acceptance of such privileges in return for giving golf instruction would constitute a breach of Rule 5-1. (New)

5-1/6 TEACHING GOLF INSTRUCTION
Question:
May an amateur golfer be employed to teach golf instruction to students e.g. PGA trainees, volunteers etc?
Answer:
No. Teaching others how to give golf instruction would constitute a breach of Rule 5-1. (New)

5-2a/1 INSTRUCTION GIVEN BY TEACHER OUTSIDE NORMAL DUTIES
Question:
May a full-time teacher in a school or other educational institution, who is employed by an Education Authority, teach golf at classes for which he receives a separate payment?
Answer:
Yes, provided:-

(a) The classes are held at the school, college or other Education Authority by whom the teacher is employed, and not any other Authority.

(b) Only pupils or students within the jurisdiction of this particular Education Authority may be taught and not pupils or students under another Authority.

(c) Payment to the teacher shall be made by the Education Authority concerned, and not by the pupils/students themselves.

(d) The total time devoted to golf instruction during a year comprises less than 50% of the time spent during the year in the performance of all duties in the school, college or other Education Authority.

Note: A counsellor at a camp may give instruction in golf to those in his charge, subject to similar provisos (see Decision 5-2a/3). (Revised)

5-2a/2 MEANING OF “EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION OR SYSTEM” AND “CAMP OR SIMILAR ORGANISED PROGRAMME”
Question:
Within the context of Rule 5-2a, what is meant by the terms “educational institution or system” and “camp or other similar organised programme”?
Answer:
An “educational institution or system” may be a school, college or university, or a similar body.

A “camp or other similar organised programme” may be a day or overnight camp in which there are activities included in the programme other than golf such as a summer camp organised for young people. (New)

5-2a/3 INSTRUCTION AT SUMMER CAMP
Question:
May a student be employed by an educational establishment at a summer camp and give golf instruction for which payment is received?
Answer:

Yes. During a summer camp, golf instruction may be given by a student who is an employee or counsellor of an educational institution or system to those in his charge, provided that the total time devoted to golf instruction comprises less than 50% of the time spent in the performance of all duties, as such an employee or counsellor. (Revised – formerly 5-2a/2)

5-2b/1 PAYMENT FOR GOLF INSTRUCTION AS PART OF APPROVED PROGRAMME
Question:
Rule 5-2b is written in deliberately broad terms to enable it to apply to a variety of coaching programmes which may be appropriate in different countries.

The intention of the Rule is to encourage the involvement of volunteers with programmes aimed at introducing young people to golf, with such volunteers providing support to qualified members of a Professional Golfers’ Association. However, the Rule is not limited in its application to apply only to the coaching of junior golfers and may be applied by a Governing Body to programmes aimed at developing the game at all levels. It is considered reasonable to reimburse volunteers for their time in coaching as part of such a programme.

It is a condition of Rule 5-2b that the programme must be approved in advance by the Governing Body thereby ensuring that the programme is co-ordinated or sanctioned appropriately.

It is a matter for the appropriate Committee of the Governing Body to decide whether a particular programme qualifies for approval under Rule 5-2b and the Governing Body may set certain criteria for a programme to follow in order for it to be approved. For example, it may limit the number of hours that an amateur golfer may receive payment or compensation for coaching or it may limit the amount payable in a given period.

The following matters must be considered in determining guidelines for the approval of such programmes by a Governing Body:

1. The national Professional Golfers’ Association in the country concerned should be consulted and the programme should be co-ordinated between the Governing Body and the national PGA.

2. An age limit may be applied to those receiving coaching. However, in countries where golf is a relatively new sport or the number of qualified PGA professionals is limited, it may not be appropriate to apply an age limit.

3. A reasonable limit should be put on the length of time an amateur golfer may coach as part of an approved programme e.g. the number of hours in any week, month or year, and /or a reasonable limit should be put on the amount of remuneration paid to an amateur golfer e.g. the maximum amount in any week, month or year.

4. A programme’s approval should be reviewed annually by the Governing Body.

5. An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not lend his name or likeness to the promotion or advertisement of the programme (Rule 6-2). (Revised)

5-3/1 CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH A WELL-KNOWN AMATEUR MAY WRITE INSTRUCTIONAL ARTICLES FOR NO COMPENSATION
Question:
Rule 5-3 states that an amateur golfer may receive payment or compensation for instruction in writing, provided his ability as a golfer was not a major factor in the commission or sale of his work. It is clear that if a well-known amateur golfer writes instructional articles he must not receive any payment or compensation for doing so. However, Rule 6-2 states that an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation may not receive a personal benefit from lending his name or likeness as a golfer to the advertisement or sale of anything. May a well-known amateur golfer write instructional articles without payment or compensation without breaching Rule 6-2?
Answer:
The answer depends on the circumstances. A well-known amateur golfer considering such an action should consult his Governing Body prior to the publication of such an article.

Examples of actions which constitute a breach of Rules 5 and 6-2 are:
– writing instructional articles or tips in any promotional material (including newsletters to clients) for a player’s firm or any other business; and
– writing a series of instructional articles for a publication.

Examples of actions which do not constitute a breach of Rules 5 and 6-2 are:
– writing a single instructional article for a publication with which the player has no connection; and
– writing an instructional pamphlet for free distribution (e.g., for junior clinics and programmes). (New)